Tippi: A Memoir – Tippi Hedren

I found this book at my library while I was actually looking for a biography on Alfred Hitchcock. All of which were out.

Tippi A Memoir
Photo courtesy of Harper Collins Publishing

So I have to say that while I adore Tippi and her work in the film industry, I was not impressed with her biography. I was very interested in all the issues she went through with Hitchcock, as it was a well-known Hollywood “secret” that he was completely obsessed with her. While detailing some of the things she experienced while working on his films, she did spare us very descriptive details and all the specifics. I must say, as he is not able to defend himself, and may have chosen not to, that we do only have her side of the story.

The remainder of the book was about how she ended up maintaining a sanctuary for wild animals on her 40 acre homestead. This too was interesting to me, as I love all animals, big and small. Except bats. But that’s another story…

I found the book as a whole very boring. It just dragged on for me, and while I am glad to have learned many new things about Tippi, I would not re-read this book.

Have you read a biography about someone you like, only to not like the book? I would love to hear about it!

The Life & Times of an Incorrigible – G.M. Roberts

GM Roberts Cover ImageG.M. Roberts tells a straight-forward story of his life, in the first-person, from his birth, his lack of enthusiasm for learning, school, or being to what to do, to his Military career, his marriage, and what he did after he was once again a civilian.

I’ve not heard very many people say they wanted to go to Vietnam during the war. Okay, I have never heard of anyone saying that. G.M. was most comfortable in the Military. He may not have always been able to have the job or position he wanted, but it was certainly the career he was meant to have.

Civilian life was not all it is cracked up to be for G.M. He had a career, and people contacting him to work and teach for them, but after losing his Emy to cancer, nothing was important anymore.

This story had me laughing out loud, and feeling great sadness. The story about the sloth still has me cracking a smile. The descriptions of the rappel demonstrations will not soon be forgotten. G.M. certainly knew how to have fun no matter what he was required to do.

Life lessons are shared throughout the story, and are lessons that can fit anyone, in any situation. They are not cliché, or redundant, or untimely. They are important. G.M. questions the influence he had on the many troops who he trained, mentored, taught, and watched both come and go in the Army. I think it is safe to say he likely influenced and helped more people than he could ever realize.

This was a very smooth, easy read for me. It was like talking to a relative, and listening to their stories of what their life was like, the things they experienced, and how it helped shape their life. I highly recommend this story, especially if you are a veteran, currently serve in the Military, or are somehow connected to someone who is.